#ASP18 Side event : revisiting the timing and duration of decision-making at the ICC

Julio Ottaviano International Conferences, News and Events, News and Events AGJA

“It’s about time – revisiting the timing and duration of decision-making at the International Criminal Court”
Tuesday 3 December 2019
World Forum, The Hague

Click here for all the pictures.

The Wayamo Foundation hosted a side event at this year’s Assembly of States Parties to interrogate and debate the timing and duration of decision-making at the International Criminal Court. The event, ‘It’s about time – revisiting the timing and duration of decision-making at the International Criminal Court’, took place on 3 December 2019 at the World Forum.

The event featured:

  • Christian Wenaweser, Permanent Representative of Liechtenstein to the United Nations
  • Elizabeth Evenson, Associate Director, International Justice Program, Human Rights Watch
  • Shehzad Charania, MBE, Director of the UK Attorney General’s Office and International
  • Lorraine Smith Van Lin, Post-conflict justice adviser, REDRESS

The event was moderated by Mark Kersten, Senior Consultant, Wayamo Foundation, and Senior Researcher, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

The event was co-hosted by the governments of Finland, Germany, The Netherlands, Austria, Norway and the UK.

Click here for the flyer.

Podcast about Wayamo’s side event :

ABOUT THE EVENT

The timing and duration of decision-making at the ICC influences the impact and image of the Court. Even the ICC’s most fervent supporters have expressed concerns about the time taken by the institution to make decisions. These include, among others, apprehension about the length of preliminary examinations, as well as the time it takes judges to approve or deny the opening of investigations, issue warrants, hold trials, arrive at verdicts and hand down judgments.

Deliberations on ICC reform are aimed at strengthening the functioning of the ICC, and bolstering the potential for it to have a positive impact on situations in which it intervenes. It is therefore essential to ask what strategic coherence can be brought to the timing and duration of the Court’s decision-making. It’s about time.

Participants explored a number of themes, including: how to take maximum advantage of the unique time period afforded by preliminary examinations to encourage and effectuate national justice for international crimes; how the timing of prosecutorial decisions can be made more strategically coherent, in order to enhance the impact of the OTP’s investigations and warrants; the question of whether geopolitics may influence decisions at the ICC; how the Chambers can increase the efficiency of proceedings and the clarity of their decision-making; how the timing of the ICC’s strategic communications could better articulate its aims and purposes and; the advisability of setting deadlines for decisions at the ICC.